Rocket League joins the Cross-Play Beta

rocket league screenshot

Yesterday Sony announced on the PlayStation Blog that Rocket League has enabled cross-platform play between all platforms. Today, PS4, Nintendo Switch, Xbox One, and Steam PC can finally play together. Crossplay between competing platforms is a major victory for consumers in this latter half of the current console generation. Sony in particular has felt tremendous pressure to enable cross-play on its platform, especially after Microsoft and Nintendo opened theirs.

Rocket League victory screen
Rocking that Sweet Tooth 24/7

Rocket League still has some work to do

While cross platform play is now enabled, it’s not ready for parties yet. Fortnite has this function already, enabling my boys and me to play together on Switch and PS4. Rocket League will add it in a future update, though information on when that’s coming isn’t available yet. In the interim, players on other platforms can join private matches together while waiting for a proper party system.

What game comes next?

There’s still some catching up to do. Both Paladins and Minecraft offer crossplay between Xbox and Switch. I’m still waiting for Xbox/PS4 crossplay on shooters like Battlefield, Anthem, Destiny, and Call of Duty. Paladins would be a great start, though.

Massively multiplayer online games (MMOGs) are also good candidates for crossplay. Since MMOGs benefit from enormous player numbers, merging the Elder Scrolls Online communities of Xbox and PS4 makes sense. Launching Final Fantasy XIV on Xbox One with crossplay—FFXIV already has crossplay between PC and PS4—could expose millions of players to the game who have never had a chance to play. Warframe came out in November 2018 for Switch, making it another strong candidate.

Crossplay a selling point

As new games come out and crossplay becomes standard practice, games with crossplay are going to enjoy greater success. As long as parity between platforms remains, consumers have nothing to fear. Xbox One and PS4 offer roughly the same performance on cross-platform games. And really, only those with a competitive element need to worry. Minecraft doesn’t care about your frames per second.

About Jess Edwards 34 Articles
Jess Edwards is a writer from Toronto, Canada. He has a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Creative Writing and loves video games, so it made sense for him to start writing about video games. His two kids are his inspiration and rediscovering his lifetime hobby through the eyes of his children inspired him to build a site for other parents.

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